FAQ’s

1. What is a DUI, Alcohol or Drug Use Risk Reduction Course?

DUI, Alcohol or Drug Use Risk Reduction is an intervention program mandated by law for people convicted of Driving Under the Influence (DUI), possession of illegal drugs, underage possession of alcohol while operating a motor vehicle, or Boating Under the Influence (BUI). It consists of two components: an assessment component and an intervention component. Both components must be successfully completed in order to obtain a certificate of completion.

2. What are the attendance policies for DUI, Alcohol, or Drug Use Risk Reduction courses?

All schools have strict attendance policies, which are outlined in the paperwork you sign when you contract with a school to attend one of its courses. You will be expected to arrive on time and to complete each session. Students that arrive late to any session can expect to be denied entry into class and may be required to start the course over again, at full cost. In addition, students that are absent or leave early from any session may be required to start the course over again, at full cost. It is recommended that you consider the course schedule carefully and take into account any potential scheduling conflicts you may have before signing a contract to attend.

3. How is Georgia’s Risk Reduction course structured?

Georgia’s risk reduction course is comprised of two components: the Assessment Component (NEEDS Assessment) and the Intervention Component. Students must complete both the Assessment and Intervention Components to receive a Certificate of Completion.

  • The Assessment Component is completed first. It is a 130-question comprehensive screening instrument used to evaluate the extent of an individual’s alcohol and drug use and its impact on driving.
  • The Intervention Component is administered after completion of the Assessment Component. It is a 20-hour course comprised of several sessions covering several days and delivered in a group environment. The Intervention Component is designed to offer therapeutic education and peer group counseling about alcohol and drug use and its effect on driving.
4. What Assessment Components are certified by the DDS for use in the State of Georgia?

DDS has approved the NEEDS Assessment Component for use in the State of Georgia, which is a copyrighted product of ADE, Inc. It is a 130-question comprehensive screening instrument used to evaluate the extent of an individual’s alcohol and drug use and its impact on driving.

5. What Intervention Components are certified by the DDS for use in the State of Georgia?

Currently, DDS has approved the Prime for Life Intervention Component for use in the State of Georgia is, which is a copyrighted product of Prevention Research Institute, Inc.

6. How do I know if a particular DUI, Alcohol, or Drug Use Risk Reduction school has been approved?

A complete list of all DDS certified DUI, Alcohol or Drug Use Risk Reduction Programs may be found on our website.

7. How long does it take to complete a DUI, Alcohol, or Drug Use Risk Reduction course?

The time it takes to complete a course depends on a variety of factors; but, in most cases, the entire 20 hour course can be completed in less than a week. It is best to discuss course schedules and any specific needs or concerns you may have with the school you choose to attend.

8. Can I obtain a refund if I am not able to attend a course or if I am late to, absent from, or leave a session early?

The decision to issue a refund or make up a missed portion of the course is a matter between the student and the school he or she contracts with to take the course. All schools have strict attendance policies, which are outlined in the student contracts you sign with the school.

9. Will the DDS accept a certificate of completion from a DUI, Alcohol, or Drug Use Risk Reduction course that I completed online?

Certificates of Completion from online DUI, Alcohol, or Drug Use Risk Reduction courses cannot be accepted by the DDS for any purposes related to an individual’s driver’s license or driving privileges.

10. What if I lose my DUI, Alcohol, or Drug Use Risk Reduction certificate of completion?

Replacement certificates may be obtained from the school where you completed the DUI, Alcohol, or Drug Use Risk Reduction course for a fee of up to $20.00.
If the school has closed, you will need to contact the DDS at (678) 413-8745 to obtain a replacement certificate. When requesting a replacement certificate from the DDS, please be prepared to furnish the name of the school you attended and the dates of the course.
Please note that DDS rules and regulations only require schools to maintain student records for a period of five (5) years.

11. Is there a minimum class size requirement for a risk reduction course?

DDS rules and regulations require programs to have a minimum of 5 paid contracts for students planning to attend a scheduled course. The Intervention Component requires a great deal of group interaction, which, according to the Prevention Research Institute, is difficult to achieve if fewer than 5 students are present. However, be mindful that there are occasions when students may fail to appear for a scheduled course. The rules do give programs the discretion to cancel, reschedule, or proceed with a course if fewer than 5 students are present.

12. Can I transfer my assessment results from one DUI, Alcohol, or Drug Use Risk Reduction school to another?

Yes. The DDS rules and regulations allow students to transfer their assessment results between schools, but only in limited circumstances:
(a) A class for which a student has a signed intervention contract has been cancelled;or,
(b)The student has moved at least thirty (30) miles away from the school that he or she contracted with to attend. The school may charge a fee of up to $25 for transferring results of an Assessment Component due to student relocation; or,
(c) There is an emergency and prior approval by the Department has been obtained.

13. How do I transfer an assessment from one school to another?

First you must locate a school that offers the class you would like to attend to confirm seat availability. Next, you will need to obtain verbal approval from the DDS. Approval can be obtained by contacting the DDS at (678) 413-8745 between the hours of 8:00 a.m. and 4:00 p.m. Monday through Friday, excluding state holidays.

Once approval has been granted by the DDS, you will be required to complete the Authorization for the Transfer and/or Release of Assessment Results form.

14. How can I file a complaint related to a DUI, Alcohol, or Drug Use Risk Reduction school, instructor, or course?

All complaints related to a school or instructor must be made in writing using the official DDS Complaint Form.

15. If you have a DUI in another state or commonwealth, how does it affect efforts in obtaining a GA driver’s license?

If your driving privileges are currently under suspension in another state or commonwealth based on a DUI conviction, you will be unable to obtain a Georgia license until all reinstatement requirements have been met and the suspension has been reinstated.

16. What is the cost of a DUI, Alcohol or Drug Use Risk Reduction course?

The cost of a DUI, Alcohol or Drug Use Risk Reduction course is set by law. Effective July 1, 2014, the total cost of the course is $360.00. This includes the Assessment Component ($100.00), the Intervention Component ($235.00), and a workbook ($25.00).

17. Does the DDS accept certificates of completion from DUI, Alcohol, or Drug Use Risk Reduction courses from other states?

It is recommended that if there is any question as to whether a particular out-of-state program will be accepted by the DDS, you should review the reciprocity list of acceptable classes from other states on our website or you may call the DDS Customer Contact Center at (678) 413-8400 prior to enrollment.

18. What is a clinical evaluation?

Laws and regulations related to clinical evaluations and substance abuse treatment providers are administered by the Georgia Department of Behavioral Health and Developmental Disabilities (DBHDD). Detailed FAQs related to clinical evaluations and substance abuse treatment providers can be found on the Georgia Department of Behavioral Health and Developmental Disabilities website.

19. When is a clinical evaluation required for purposes of reinstating my Georgia driver’s license or driving privileges?

Documented proof of having completed a state-approved clinical evaluation is required of all persons that wish to reinstate a suspension of their Georgia driver’s license or driving privileges resulting from two or more convictions of driving under the influence within the past ten (10) years. Laws and regulations related to clinical evaluations and substance abuse treatment providers may be found on the Georgia Department of Behavioral Health and Developmental Disabilities website.

20. How does the course financing option work?

Another DUI School is the only DUI School offering 0% interest financing for the Georgia DUI Risk Reduction Program.

The financing break-down and fee schedule is attached.

 

The Program Cost is $360.00

This fee is broken down as follows:

$100 State Assessment

$25 for Participants Manual

$225 for Risk Reduction Course

The 0% interest financing option is paid as follows.

Payment 1 = $60

Payment 1 is required to register for the course.

Payment 2 = $60

After payment 2 has been made, the student can take the assessment.

Payment 3 = $60

 

 

After payment 3 has been made the student will receive a code allowing them to register for The DUI Risk Reduction course on any future available dates.

Payment 4 = $60

Payment 5 = $60

Payment 6 = $60

After Payment 6 has been made, the students course record can be processed, and the student receives their certificate, which is required by the State of Georgia to reinstate their drivers license.

Total Paid is $360.00

Because this is an offer of 0% financing designed for the sole purpose of helping the students, no refunds are allowed. Students can change their course booking dates free of charge; however, should the student choose to forego finishing the program all monies will be forfeited. The student must acknowledge this policy with every payment.

 

21. What exactly is an Ignition Interlock Device?

An ignition interlock device is a handheld breathalyzer that is installed directly into your vehicle. The devices come in different shapes and sizes but are usually about the size of a television remote.

The first ignition interlock device hit the market in 1988 and after proving to be successful in preventing drunk driving fatalities, their use nationwide has increased each year.

An ignition interlock device is comprised of a few different pieces:

  • Handheld unit
  • Mouthpiece
  • Relay cord connecting the device to your vehicle
  • Camera unit (if required to have by your state)

 

There are numerous ignition interlock device manufacturers in the United States and each device looks a little different but ultimately, they all have the same components and are roughly the same size.

The handheld fits comfortably in your center console and the relay cord is long enough to allow you to move the device around your front seat, as needed. The camera (if required), is mounted to the front windshield by a certified installer.

Now that you’ve had a brief introduction to what an ignition interlock device actually is, let’s dive deeper into how it works.

 21. How does an ignition interlock work?

Handheld ignition interlock devices have two main jobs:

Prevent somebody from starting their car while intoxicated

Guarantee continued sobriety from the driver throughout their time behind the wheel

Let’s look at how the devices work to accomplish each of these goals.

Preventing a driver from starting the vehicle while intoxicated

Anybody with an ignition interlock device installed in their vehicle will be required to provide a breath sample into the mouthpiece of the device before they are able to start their vehicle.

State certified ignition interlock devices use a fuel cell technology to measure the amount of alcohol on the user’s breath. If the breath sample detects alcohol at or above the limit set by the state (usually 0.02), the car will not start.

If the breath sample returns a breath alcohol concentration (BrAC) below that set limit, the driver will be able to insert their key into the ignition and start their vehicle.

Each state has individual ignition interlock device laws and regulations that determine what happens if you provide a failing breath sample.

Some states allow you to try again after waiting a short period of time but may lock you out after so many failed samples. More about lockouts later in the guide.

Other states allow you to continue blowing into the device until you’ve provided a passing breath sample and can start your car.

Your ignition interlock provider, attorney, court or Motor Vehicle Department can walk you through the requirements in your state so there aren’t any surprises.

Of course, the best way to get through an interlock requirement is to refrain from trying to drive after consuming any alcohol.

You will have 4-6 minutes to complete a random retest

Continuous sobriety while the vehicle is running

Once your vehicle is started, an ignition interlock device will require you to continue providing breath samples throughout the duration of your trip.

Simply put, this ensures that the driver doesn’t just have a sober person start their vehicle for them, so they could continue driving after drinking.

These continued tests, often referred to as random retests, are required by your state and all ignition interlock providers must abide by state laws requiring them.

Most ignition interlock providers give the driver 4-6 minutes to complete a retest once prompted. This allows the driver to pull over to the side of the road if needed or take extra precautionary measures if driving in heavy traffic.

22. How does an ignition interlock device work?

Handheld ignition interlock devices have two main jobs:

Prevent somebody from starting their car while intoxicated

Guarantee continued sobriety from the driver throughout their time behind the wheel

Let’s look at how the devices work to accomplish each of these goals.

Preventing a driver from starting the vehicle while intoxicated

Anybody with an ignition interlock device installed in their vehicle will be required to provide a breath sample into the mouthpiece of the device before they are able to start their vehicle.

State certified ignition interlock devices use a fuel cell technology to measure the amount of alcohol on the user’s breath. If the breath sample detects alcohol at or above the limit set by the state (usually 0.02), the car will not start.

If the breath sample returns a breath alcohol concentration (BrAC) below that set limit, the driver will be able to insert their key into the ignition and start their vehicle.

Each state has individual ignition interlock device laws and regulations that determine what happens if you provide a failing breath sample.

Some states allow you to try again after waiting a short period of time but may lock you out after so many failed samples. More about lockouts later in the guide.

Other states allow you to continue blowing into the device until you’ve provided a passing breath sample and can start your car.

Your ignition interlock provider, attorney, court or Motor Vehicle Department can walk you through the requirements in your state so there aren’t any surprises.

Of course, the best way to get through an interlock requirement is to refrain from trying to drive after consuming any alcohol.

You will have 4-6 minutes to complete a random retest

Continuous sobriety while the vehicle is running

Once your vehicle is started, an ignition interlock device will require you to continue providing breath samples throughout the duration of your trip.

Simply put, this ensures that the driver doesn’t just have a sober person start their vehicle for them, so they could continue driving after drinking.

These continued tests, often referred to as random retests, are required by your state and all ignition interlock providers must abide by state laws requiring them.

Most ignition interlock providers give the driver 4-6 minutes to complete a retest once prompted. This allows the driver to pull over to the side of the road if needed or take extra precautionary measures if driving in heavy traffic.

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